The aim of co-creation is to create shared ownership with your stakeholders.

Why co-create?

Co-creation enables you, as a heritage professional, to collaborate with and learn from new audiences. A co-creation process can enable your organisation to find a connection between groups that would normally not meet; to raise awareness and sensitivity towards important issues and to build relationships between groups and individuals that exist well beyond the scope of a project. Co-creation is hands-on and creative by nature, its aim is to create shared value – together with your stakeholders.

Find out

How to get started: toolkit

Contribution, collaboration, co-creation, participation: no one model is better than the others or a progressive step towards a model of “maximal participation. But until you try things out, co-creation remains a bit of a black box for a lot of people. To design how you want to work with your stakeholders, we have developed a brainstorm toolkit that lets you playfully explore what it means to work in co-creation. The kit facilitates a structured brainstorm with your team and helps establish the scope of your ambition. The toolkit will be available soon, you can sign up now to keep informed.

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Case study

Europeana 1914-1918

“Connecting one grandfather’s experiences in France to another’s in Germany, soon shows people how much both are alike.” Ad Pollé, Europeana

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Case study

Rijksstudio

“For us digital tools are just tools that will help us reach a larger audience and allow them to be creative and connect to the collection.” Peter Gorgels, Rijksmuseum

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Case study

Young Curators, Digital Design and the Living Archive

“Creativity and ‘making’ are used as methods to relate to a historical collection in a way that opens up new conversations.” Jenny Siung, Chester Beatty Library

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Riches Interventions

“Transfer of the experiences to the larger organisation within the museum and making the relationship with young people sustainable is an important next step” Wayne Modest, Museum of World Cultures

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Panna's & Akka's

“Our connection to visitors, our storytellers, is very personal. It is about listening to them. It is about getting engaged. When you talk about heritage you also talk about voices, about who is speaking.” Danielle Kuijten, Imagine IC

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meSch

“In a multidisciplinary project consortium such as meSch, which includes technology developers, designers, academics and heritage professionals, it is important to find a common language and understanding of (technical) possibilities early on in the project.” Dick van Dijk, Waag Society

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West Side Stories

“Not having everything thought out in advance meant that there was room to improvise, listen to feedback and be flexible to wishes from and developments within the neighbourhood. We were able to adjust strategies as we went along.” Lisa Kleeven, Foam

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Planting the Future

“The aim of these sessions was to find new ways to connect the knowledge about plants and biodiversity to the needs of diverse audiences.” Dick van Dijk, Waag society

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Oramics to Electronica

“Eventually the exhibition portrayed a different story from that which the Science Museum would normally tell in their exhibitions.” Merel van der Vaart, Science Museum

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Re:make the museum– Derby Silk Mill

“Our curators’ professional knowledge of an object was only one part of the story, because the public’s own perception of their local history, their own interests and their emotions regarding the items were hugely relevant too.” Hannah Fox, Derby Silk Mill

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